Truly Madly Guilty – Liane Moriarty

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9/10. A very clever and perfectly suited cover image!

“Despite their differences, Erika and Clementine have been best friends since they were children. So when Erika needs help, Clementine should be the obvious person to turn to. Or so you’d think. For Clementine, as a mother of a two desperately trying to practise for the audition of a lifetime, the last thing she needs is Erika asking for something, again. But the barbecue should be the perfect way to forget their problems for a while. Especially when their hosts, Vid and Tiffany, are only too happy to distract them. Which is how it all spirals out of control…”

I’ve read most of Liane’s Moriarty’s books – I reviewed The Last AnniversaryWhat Alice Forgot and The Husband’s Secret on KCARAB – so when I saw Truly Madly Guilty on NetGalley I was quick to snap it up and delve into Liane Moriarty’s new cleverly-drawn intricate cast of characters. The strength of her novels has always lain in her protagonists and their interweaving stories, and her latest book is no different.

In Truly Madly Guilty, a raft of apposite characters and couples – cellist Clementine and laid-back Sam, neat-freak Erica and buttoned-up Oliver, former lap-dancer Tiffany and gregarious Vid – all come together for a barbecue one day, which turns out to be a fateful event. Moriarty teases out the details of the catastrophe bit by bit, switching between the hours leading up to and at the barbecue and the weeks following it. As she cleverly builds up the characters’ back stories and details from the days events, we’re led to question both exactly what happened and who was to blame for it.

What starts out as a summer event between friends leads to rifts in relationships, reveals hidden feelings and leaves everyone present feeling guilty and adrift. Will they be able to find their way back to their partners and friends – or will that one terrible day change everything forever?

Moriarty masterfully builds suspense and tension, drawing out the denouement expertly and revealing each character in rich detail. Even the characters on the edge’s of the story’s periphery – parents, grandparents and neighbours – are drawn in to this complex, dramatic and powerful novel.

Many thanks to Penguin and NetGalley for the review copy.

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