Brooklyn Girls: Coco – Gemma Burgess

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8/10. Fits in with the genre nicely, and I get the wallpaper, but I didn’t like the soft blur on the picture – doesn’t fit with Pia and Angie. I prefer the purple to my yellow though!

“Coco has always been the ‘good one’. But when she catches her boyfriend cheating on her, she decides it’s time to break bad. Coco swiftly goes from spending all her time baking and reading to working in (and dancing on) a bar, and falling in and out of love. Meanwhile Coco’s best friends are suddenly plunged into break-ups, break-downs, big breaks, and before long the group is on the verge of quitting New York City altogether. Is Coco strong enough to keep them all together – and find herself at the same time?”

I’ve said it before and I’ve said it again: I LOVE Gemma Burgess. You’ve probably spied her on my blog a few times before (I love The Dating Detox and A Girl Like You) and I’ve reviewed the first two books in the ‘Brooklyn Girls’ series – Pia and Angie. When I saw that the third book came out I was simultaneously excited to read it and saddened to find out that it was the last ‘Brooklyn Girls’ novel; I’d long been waiting to see life from super-sweet baker and perpetually internalising quiet girl Coco, but I still feel that Julia and Madeleine (especially Madeleine) should have their stories told, too. Moving on…

As soon as I opened the book I was assured that this was typical ‘Brooklyn Girls’ style; witty, warm and relatable, with lots of entertaining drama hiding genuine life advice for other confused twentysomethings, no matter where they live or what their life situation might be. Coco is very good at smiling, being pleasant and not rocking the boat – but when it seems like her current life isn’t quite working out (she finds out that her boyfriend is cheating on her and she’s fed up of working in a job with heinous colleagues that she doesn’t truly love) she bails, in a very un-Coco style, and makes some dramatic new choices. First move: get a job in a bar. Second move: publicly dump her traitorous boyfriend in said bar. Third move: start a fling with her hot Irish boss whilst also flirting with an old friend who’s sneaking her into NYU literature classes for free…

Whilst everyone questions Coco’s choices and tries to put her back on a safe shelf (her gently controlling sister and father being the two worst culprits) Coco stops listening to the self-doubting voice in her head and slowly realises that she’s loving her cobbled-together new life. She’s not baked cakes in a while, her body-image neuroses start to fade away with the help of handsome Joe’s attention, and she’s actually really good at her combo day job of cocktail maker and lecturer stealer. But when she suspects that the feelings she has for Joe aren’t entirely mutual, she presses self-destruct on her new life and all of the choices that she’s made…

Apart from ending a little too quickly for me (personally the series ended a little too quickly, but there you go), Coco is the perfect addition to the rest of the series. Quirky, hilarious and no-holds-barred (my favourite line has to be “I can’t iron my goddamn vagina, Martha“), Gemma Burgess’ ‘Brookyn Girls’ series has turned out to be an unexpected favourite – despite me being quite a bit older than 22.

 

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